NAD+Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Drdavid
Posts: 309
Joined: Thu Aug 15, 2019 9:59 am

Re: Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Post by Drdavid » Thu Aug 29, 2019 7:44 pm

Thank you for sharing. The research looks good for reduction of anxiety with NAD+ but I do agree the increase in energy and focus can dramatically reduce anxiety levels.


vandan
Posts: 67
Joined: Wed Aug 21, 2019 9:44 pm

Re: Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Post by vandan » Mon Sep 02, 2019 5:58 am

Thanks Doc David at al.
That study on chronic fatigue is interesting. I was surprised no energy gains were noticed but then I thought perhaps this speaks to the psychological overtones of the disease.

Look I know I keep going on about it but a reduction in anxiety, which is now a high prevalence disorder, is limitless. If this can reduce anxiety levels in the chronic fatigue patients just image its value.
drkris69
Posts: 213
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2019 2:41 pm

Re: Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Post by drkris69 » Mon Sep 02, 2019 9:57 am

I concur with you as well. I too have been recently taking NMN with NAD+ and have noticed a huge change in energy levels and cognitive levels. I cant say enough about ABN products! They have changed my life. :D
Drdavid
Posts: 309
Joined: Thu Aug 15, 2019 9:59 am

Re: Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Post by Drdavid » Tue Sep 03, 2019 10:17 pm

Thanks Vandan and DrKris69,

Having a product that can reduce anxiety levels and increase energy levels is a huge win. Most people would like a chance to try a natural product over a pharmaceutical. With chronic fatigue on the rise these products could change the lives of millions.
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daviddean
Posts: 34
Joined: Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:14 am

Re: Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Post by daviddean » Wed Sep 04, 2019 6:09 am

Alterations in mitochondrial functions such as oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and membrane polarity, which increase oxidative stress
and apoptosis, may precede the development of depressive symptoms.

Here are some very interesting scientific studies that prove the correlation between the mitochodrial function and mental health (full texts available as pdf):

Supplemental Niacinamide Mitigates Anxiety Symptoms: Three Case Reports
Jonathan E. Prousky, N.D., FRSH1

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0c55/e ... d58202.pdf

Mitochondria and Mood: Mitochondrial Dysfunction as a Key Player in the Manifestation of Depression.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29928190

Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Depression
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4981740/

A model of the mitochondrial basis of bipolar disorder
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28093238

The Role of Nutrients in Protecting Mitochondrial Function and Neurotransmitter Signaling: Implications for the Treatment of Depression, PTSD, and Suicidal Behaviors
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25365455

Vitamins Associated with Brain Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer Disease: Biomarkers, Epidemiological and Experimental
Evidence, Plausible Mechanisms, and Knowledge Gaps

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29141977

NAD+ in aging, metabolism, and neurodegeneration
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is a coenzyme found in all living cells. It serves both as a critical coenzyme for enzymes that fuel reduction-oxidation reactions, carrying electrons from one reaction to another, and as a cosubstrate for other enzymes such as the sirtuins and poly(adenosine diphosphate–ribose) polymerases. Cellular NAD+ concentrations change during aging, and modulation of NAD+ usage or production can prolong both health span and life span. Here we review factors that regulate NAD+ and discuss how supplementation with NAD+ precursors may represent a new therapeutic opportunity for aging and its associated disorders, particularly neurodegenerative diseases.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26785480
Drdavid
Posts: 309
Joined: Thu Aug 15, 2019 9:59 am

Re: Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Post by Drdavid » Thu Nov 07, 2019 12:30 pm

Thank you David for the research. I will read through it and start passing it out to patients.
NewLifeScience
Posts: 105
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2019 4:17 pm

Re: Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Post by NewLifeScience » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:05 pm

i've also noticed a decrease in anxiety, (since using nasal NAD+) especially in the evening when i typically would notice it more.
Taking:
Resveratrol 400mg since June 2019; 600mg since October 1
NMN Sublingual 250mg since june 2019 500mg since September 2019
NAD+ Nasal, appx 100mg per day since September 2019; 200mg per day beginning mid November
NewLifeScience
Posts: 105
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2019 4:17 pm

Re: Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Post by NewLifeScience » Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:06 pm

daviddean wrote:
Wed Sep 04, 2019 6:09 am
Alterations in mitochondrial functions such as oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and membrane polarity, which increase oxidative stress
and apoptosis, may precede the development of depressive symptoms.

Here are some very interesting scientific studies that prove the correlation between the mitochodrial function and mental health (full texts available as pdf):

Supplemental Niacinamide Mitigates Anxiety Symptoms: Three Case Reports
Jonathan E. Prousky, N.D., FRSH1

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0c55/e ... d58202.pdf

Mitochondria and Mood: Mitochondrial Dysfunction as a Key Player in the Manifestation of Depression.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29928190

Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Depression
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4981740/

A model of the mitochondrial basis of bipolar disorder
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28093238

The Role of Nutrients in Protecting Mitochondrial Function and Neurotransmitter Signaling: Implications for the Treatment of Depression, PTSD, and Suicidal Behaviors
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25365455

Vitamins Associated with Brain Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer Disease: Biomarkers, Epidemiological and Experimental
Evidence, Plausible Mechanisms, and Knowledge Gaps

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29141977

NAD+ in aging, metabolism, and neurodegeneration
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is a coenzyme found in all living cells. It serves both as a critical coenzyme for enzymes that fuel reduction-oxidation reactions, carrying electrons from one reaction to another, and as a cosubstrate for other enzymes such as the sirtuins and poly(adenosine diphosphate–ribose) polymerases. Cellular NAD+ concentrations change during aging, and modulation of NAD+ usage or production can prolong both health span and life span. Here we review factors that regulate NAD+ and discuss how supplementation with NAD+ precursors may represent a new therapeutic opportunity for aging and its associated disorders, particularly neurodegenerative diseases.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26785480
Wow @daviddean! thanks for all the research links!
Taking:
Resveratrol 400mg since June 2019; 600mg since October 1
NMN Sublingual 250mg since june 2019 500mg since September 2019
NAD+ Nasal, appx 100mg per day since September 2019; 200mg per day beginning mid November
CeeJayBee
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2019 4:19 pm

Re: Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Post by CeeJayBee » Thu Nov 14, 2019 6:22 pm

NewLifeScience wrote:
Thu Aug 29, 2019 7:20 pm
it may be anecdotal, but i do find my anxiety is reduced within a short time of using NAD+ nasal.

i also equate having more motivation to having less anxiety, but that is just a personal observation.
I was just going to say this.. i think it is an energy boost without the adrenaline.
Fred
Posts: 230
Joined: Tue Aug 13, 2019 3:17 pm
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Re: Anyone else feeling less anxiety?

Post by Fred » Fri Nov 15, 2019 3:15 am

In this recent study NMN reduced anxiety/fear in aged genetically engineered mice:

"Nampt knockdown recapitulates hippocampal cognitive phenotypes in old mice which nicotinamide mononucleotide improves"
In our present study, we found that older mice developed a cognitive hypersensitivity following exposure to certain aversive environmental stimuli, possibly reflecting age-related alterations in emotionality (fear and/or anxiety) and sensory processing.
Interestingly, NMN supplementation to old mice was able to mitigate age-associated cognitive hypersensitivity and age-associated increases in shock sensitivity, raising the possibility that modifications in the NMN supplementation procedure (e.g., extended treatment duration) might lead to greater positive effects concerning the putative emotionality component of the age-related hypersensitivity as well.
In conclusion, our study demonstrates that age-associated alteration in cognitive and behavioral functions is induced by reduced NAMPT-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis in the hippocampus, particularly in the CA1 region, in old mice.

Our study also shows that NMN supplementation, even in the short term, is able to mitigate the age-associated alteration in the sensory processing of some aversive stimuli and possibly other related behaviors. Although further detailed analyses will be necessary, our findings provide critical insights into how aging affects cognitive and behavioral functions and how such impairments can be prevented or treated to enhance the quality of our later lives.
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41514-018-0029-z
Last edited by Fred on Sat Nov 16, 2019 1:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
Fred
Registered dietitian, Sweden.
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