NutritionCurcumin: The best anti-inflammatory?

drkris69
Posts: 474
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2019 2:41 pm

Re: Curcumin: The best anti-inflammatory?

Post by drkris69 » Tue May 12, 2020 2:26 pm

Nice DrDavid!


NewLifeScience
Posts: 218
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2019 4:17 pm

Re: Curcumin: The best anti-inflammatory?

Post by NewLifeScience » Tue May 12, 2020 3:19 pm

smokinjoe wrote:
Tue May 05, 2020 7:54 pm
Just a general question for this well informed forum...

Is Curcumin one of the best anti-inflammatory additives you can get?

What would be the best source? Curry? or is it yet another supplement to take in capsule form?
Well sure, it is probably best to check with your Doctor. But anti-inflammatories are important to be aware of. I am convinced most cancers are due to chronic inflammation, and most chronic pain involves inflammation.

Anti=inflammatories are up there with NMN as far as their importance IMO.
Taking:
Resveratrol 400mg since June 2019; 600mg since October 1; 800mg since January 2020
NMN Sublingual 250mg since june 2019 500mg since September 2019
NAD+ Nasal, appx 100mg per day since September 2019; 200mg per day beginning mid November
canadahealthy
Posts: 166
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2019 5:31 pm

Re: Curcumin: The best anti-inflammatory?

Post by canadahealthy » Wed May 13, 2020 8:10 pm

NewLifeScience wrote:
Tue May 12, 2020 3:19 pm
smokinjoe wrote:
Tue May 05, 2020 7:54 pm
Just a general question for this well informed forum...

Is Curcumin one of the best anti-inflammatory additives you can get?

What would be the best source? Curry? or is it yet another supplement to take in capsule form?
Well sure, it is probably best to check with your Doctor. But anti-inflammatories are important to be aware of. I am convinced most cancers are due to chronic inflammation, and most chronic pain involves inflammation.

Anti=inflammatories are up there with NMN as far as their importance IMO.
I agree. We need to take inflammation seriously, be it right after an injury, and more importantly if it is something chronic.
Newage
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Re: Curcumin: The best anti-inflammatory?

Post by Newage » Sun May 17, 2020 4:00 pm

My personal belief is that inflammation in excess is the precursor to most disease.
“Reduce one and you reduce the other”
Fasting and calorie restriction in my opinion is one of the most beneficial tools in the quest to limit inflammation...
smokinjoe
Posts: 64
Joined: Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:24 am

Re: Curcumin: The best anti-inflammatory?

Post by smokinjoe » Mon May 18, 2020 6:51 pm

Newage wrote:
Sun May 17, 2020 4:00 pm
My personal belief is that inflammation in excess is the precursor to most disease.
“Reduce one and you reduce the other”
Fasting and calorie restriction in my opinion is one of the most beneficial tools in the quest to limit inflammation...
I agree, but these are not always available to everyone, so dietary or even supplementary anti-inflammatories are a great alternative.
Male, 41
no i don't smoke :)

taking:
NAD+ nasal since August 15, 2019
NMN powder, 125 mg per day; 625 per day since Oct 1, 2019
Resveratrol 600mg, since September 15, 2019
Drdavid
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Re: Curcumin: The best anti-inflammatory?

Post by Drdavid » Tue May 19, 2020 8:23 am

NewLifeScience wrote:
Tue May 12, 2020 3:19 pm
smokinjoe wrote:
Tue May 05, 2020 7:54 pm
Just a general question for this well informed forum...

Is Curcumin one of the best anti-inflammatory additives you can get?

What would be the best source? Curry? or is it yet another supplement to take in capsule form?
Well sure, it is probably best to check with your Doctor. But anti-inflammatories are important to be aware of. I am convinced most cancers are due to chronic inflammation, and most chronic pain involves inflammation.

Anti=inflammatories are up there with NMN as far as their importance IMO.
Here is an article that supports this thought:

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 Sep 1.
Published in final edited form as:
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 Sep; 23(9): 1729–1751.
Published online 2014 Jun 24. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0064
PMCID: PMC4155060
NIHMSID: NIHMS608466
PMID: 24962838
A review of the application of inflammatory biomarkers in epidemiologic cancer research
Darren R. Brenner,1,2 Dominique Scherer,3 Kenneth Muir,4 Joellen Schildkraut,5 Paolo Boffetta,6 Margaret R. Spitz,7 Loic LeMarchand,8 Andrew T. Chan,9 Ellen L. Goode,10 Cornelia M. Ulrich,*,3,11 and Rayjean J. Hung*,1
Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4155060/
CeeJayBee
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Re: Curcumin: The best anti-inflammatory?

Post by CeeJayBee » Tue May 19, 2020 12:22 pm

NewLifeScience wrote:
Thu May 07, 2020 8:29 pm
Hmm. Looks like Curcumin and Boswellia may be good candidates.

I am going to try them out together.
So Curcumin is from Turmeric in curry and Boswellia is from the Frankincense plant, correct?
I know curcumin acts as a senolytic. I have googled Boswellia and it hints it may be, or at least that is aids in cell senescence.

From what i am reading in this thread, providing you do not have a blood thinner in your meds, you can take these for multiple benefits. Obviously anti-inflammation is very important. I also strongly believe plant based sources trump pharmaceuticals for this type of purpose, although on the one hand you don't have the strict quality controls, but on the other hand they may be less toxic.
RobSmith
Posts: 41
Joined: Mon Feb 24, 2020 10:34 am
Location: UK

Re: Curcumin: The best anti-inflammatory?

Post by RobSmith » Fri May 22, 2020 9:29 am

Another mouse study confirming that inflammation accelerates ageing but specifically in older people the acceleration could be caused by T cells because they release inflammation-stimulating molecules (whilst NAD+ appears to reverse the ageing).

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/05 ... ake-us-old

T cells are supposed to defend us from pathogens, but a new mouse study suggests they may also speed ageing. Blocking inflammation caused by the cells or boosting their supply of a key metabolic molecule lessened the severity of some ageing-related symptoms in rodents, raising the possibility these treatments could benefit older people.

The discovery is “a fantastic result directly linking metabolism, inflammation, and ageing,” says immunologist Kylie Quinn of RMIT University, Bundoora, in Australia. “They’ve done a really thorough job of making sure it’s the T cells” that are causing the mice to age quickly.

Our T cells let us down as we age, becoming weaker pathogen fighters. This decline helps explain why elderly people are more susceptible to infections and less responsive to vaccines. One reason T cells falter as we get older is that mitochondria, the structures that serve as power plants inside cells, begin to malfunction.
But T cells might not just reflect ageing. They could also promote it. Older people have chronic inflammation throughout the body, known as inflammaging, and researchers have proposed it spurs ageing. T cells may stoke this process because they release inflammation-stimulating molecules.

To test that hypothesis, immunologist María Mittelbrunn of the University Hospital 12 October’s Health Research Institute and colleagues genetically modified mice to lack a protein in the mitochondria of their T cells. This alteration forces the cells to switch to a less efficient metabolic mechanism for obtaining energy.

By the time the rodents were 7 months old, typically the prime of life for a mouse, they already appeared to be in their dotage, the team reports today in Science. Compared with typical mice, the modified rodents were slow and sluggish. They had shrunken, weak muscles and were less resistant to infections. Like many elderly people, they suffered from weakened hearts and shed much of their body fat.
T cells from the altered mice poured out molecules that trigger inflammation, the team found, suggesting the cells could be partially responsible for the animals’ physical deterioration. “The immune system plays a role in increasing the velocity of ageing,” Mittelbrunn says.

The scientists also tested whether they could slow the ageing clock. First they dosed the mice with a drug that blocks tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), one of the inflammation-inducing molecules that T cells unleash; the treatment increased the animals’ grip strength, improved their performance in a maze, and boosted the heart’s pumping power.

Mittelbrunn and colleagues also gave the animals a compound that raises levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a molecule that’s vital for metabolic reactions that enable cells to extract energy from food. NAD’s cellular concentrations typically decline with age, and the researchers found that ramping it up in the mice made them more active and strengthened their hearts.
NewLifeScience
Posts: 218
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2019 4:17 pm

Re: Curcumin: The best anti-inflammatory?

Post by NewLifeScience » Tue May 26, 2020 4:18 pm

I think 2 anti-inflammatories are better than

1. So black pepper and curcumin... or boswellia and black pepper..

if we take chili peppers without having to burn our faces off, more people would take them too.
Taking:
Resveratrol 400mg since June 2019; 600mg since October 1; 800mg since January 2020
NMN Sublingual 250mg since june 2019 500mg since September 2019
NAD+ Nasal, appx 100mg per day since September 2019; 200mg per day beginning mid November
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