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Re: Age-related hair loss and vitamin E

Posted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 2:33 pm
by jocko6889
There are topical creams to numb the skin when derma rolling the face and neck but obviously you can't do that for the scalp area unless you're bald. I'll try to document my experience replicating the study.

Re: Age-related hair loss and vitamin E

Posted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 4:09 pm
by josephr143
jocko6889 wrote:
Fri Sep 06, 2019 2:33 pm
There are topical creams to numb the skin when derma rolling the face and neck but obviously you can't do that for the scalp area unless you're bald. I'll try to document my experience replicating the study.
I have used a derma roller on my face, neck, and other areas with good results. Bought one on ebay for about $6 and works well. There are many youtube videos on the subject so I would advise anyone to watch a few before trying it yourself. You can overdo it.

Re: Age-related hair loss and vitamin E

Posted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 8:12 am
by canadahealthy
The main cause for hair loss among males is the built up of DHT in the scalp.

Does this research address this?

Re: Age-related hair loss and vitamin E

Posted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 8:22 am
by NewLifeScience
canadahealthy wrote:
Sat Sep 07, 2019 8:12 am
The main cause for hair loss among males is the built up of DHT in the scalp.

Does this research address this?
It's possible that this research refers to alopecia, rather than male pattern baldness.

Anyone else care to comment on this?

Re: Age-related hair loss and vitamin E

Posted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 3:01 am
by Macrobian
Male pattern baldness is also a type of alopecia (androgenic alopecia - AGA). This study did not look specifically at whether tocotrienols influence the levels of DHT or sensitivity to DHT. What we do know is that tocotrienols are very potent antioxidants. While DHT is often seen as the main culprit in AGA the full story is a bit more complex as this paper confirms.

Even the diet plays a role in the progression (or delaying the onset) of AGA. Fortes et al. 2018 (behind paywall) investigated the effects of Mediterranean diet on AGA and concluded that a high consumption of raw vegetables (at least 3 times a day) and a high consumption of fresh herbs (3 or more regularly) significantly reduce the risk of AGA. Polyphenols are known to inhibit 5α-reductase enzyme - and many fresh herbs, besides being antioxidants, also exhibit estrogenic activity.

Re: Age-related hair loss and vitamin E

Posted: Fri Sep 27, 2019 8:15 pm
by Vandevalk1
I've just received my derma rollers and i will also try try replicate this study. remembering that when the follicle completely dies, it cannot grow back. I dont expect to see hair growth in these areas but more so where the hair is thinning and the follicles are being suffocated by DHT so to speak.

Re: Age-related hair loss and vitamin E

Posted: Sat Sep 28, 2019 1:57 pm
by Macrobian
Yes, please keep us posted! The best way to track any changes would be by taking pictures regularly (with the same lighting conditions). An even more precise measurement would be if the hair in the area were shortly trimmed (normal hair growth can create an illusion of a a gradual increase in density) - but, depending on your hairstyle, that might be too much of a cosmetic sacrifice! Would be interesting to see if you could experience better results by simultaneously increasing your intake of tocotrienols too.

Re: Age-related hair loss and vitamin E

Posted: Sat Sep 28, 2019 9:10 pm
by OzSport
A friend of mine had the dermaroller stuff done to her face at a local spa, and she looked great after! Her skin was fine before, but after the dermaroller procedure, her face did look much "brighter" (she's in her late 40s). After the procedure is done, you have to stay away from the sun and apply some creams; I think she had the procedure done on a Friday evening, and then stayed indoors for the weekend in time to go back to work on Monday.

Re: Age-related hair loss and vitamin E

Posted: Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:10 am
by Vandevalk1
OzSport wrote:
Sat Sep 28, 2019 9:10 pm
A friend of mine had the dermaroller stuff done to her face at a local spa, and she looked great after! Her skin was fine before, but after the dermaroller procedure, her face did look much "brighter" (she's in her late 40s). After the procedure is done, you have to stay away from the sun and apply some creams; I think she had the procedure done on a Friday evening, and then stayed indoors for the weekend in time to go back to work on Monday.
This is interesting.

Any explanation as to why she had to stay out of the sub for so long?

Re: Age-related hair loss and vitamin E

Posted: Mon Sep 30, 2019 12:27 pm
by Fred
Vandevalk1 wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:10 am
Any explanation as to why she had to stay out of the sub for so long?
When you damage the skin with needles, acids or energy-based treatments you get inflammation. That makes you more vulnerable against PIH (post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation).

Also, daylight (both UV and visible light) is what mainly caused you to need these treatments in the first place. They´re all designed to get rid of daylight-damaged skin cells.

If one wears sunscreen daily as a moisturizer these treatments can be greatly postponed. Sun protected skin treated with retinoids looks very good, at least 10-15 year better than non-protected non-retinized skin.

The skin is also functionally younger, it´s smoother, more elastic, even-toned and has no pre-neoplastic lesions (actinic keratosis) that half of 40+ people have. Precursors to basal cell carcinoma caused by decades of lack of sun protection. Men have more AKs due to negligence and outdoor occupations.