FastingEffect of Fasting on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease in Male Subjects

p75213
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Effect of Fasting on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease in Male Subjects

Post by p75213 » Tue Feb 11, 2020 4:58 pm

Abstract
To address the effect of fasting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD). A total of 22 male subjects have been recruited for this study. Subjects with vocal fold pathologies, recent history of upper respiratory tract infection or laryngeal manipulation were excluded. Demographic data included age and history of smoking. All subjects were evaluated while fasting for at least 12 h and non-fasting. By non-fasting we mean that they ate and drank during the day at their discretion with no reservation. The abstention from water and or food intake during the non-fasting period extended from few minutes to 3 h. All subjects were evaluated at the same time during the day. The evaluation consisted of a laryngeal examination and the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The Reflux Finding Score (RFS) was used to report on the reflux laryngeal findings. Subjects were considered to have LPRD if either the RSI or the RFS were positive (>9 RSI, >7 RFS). There was a non-significant increase in the total prevalence of LPRD while fasting compared to non-fasting (32 vs. 50 % while fasting, p value 0.361). In the RSI, the most common symptoms while non-fasting and fasting were throat clearing (64 vs. 68 %), postnasal drip (45 vs. 59 %) and globus sensation (36 vs. 50 %). The average score of all the three increased significantly while fasting. For the RFS the most common laryngeal findings in the non-fasting group versus the fasting group were erythema (77 vs. 68 %), thick endolaryngeal mucus (77 vs. 77 %) and posterior commissure hypertrophy (55 vs. 64 %). Fasting results in a nonsignificant increase in laryngopharyngeal reflux disease. The increase can be hypothetically explained on the change in eating habits and the known alterations in gastric secretions during Ramadan. Fasting subjects must be alert to the effect of LPRD on their throat and voice in particular.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2257624 ... -subjects/


drkris69
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Re: Effect of Fasting on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease in Male Subjects

Post by drkris69 » Wed Feb 12, 2020 9:36 am

Interesting thanks for sharing.
Newage
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Re: Effect of Fasting on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease in Male Subjects

Post by Newage » Wed Feb 12, 2020 12:28 pm

Thank you for the interesting post as Reflux symptoms seem to be to be an ongoing issue for a large percentage of the population.
Fred

Re: Effect of Fasting on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease in Male Subjects

Post by Fred » Wed Feb 12, 2020 2:08 pm

This study showed that fasting had a few mild temporary negative side effects on the throat. By fasting "throat-clearing" increased 4%, "postnasal drip" 14% and "feelings of a lump in the throat" by 14%.

My reaction is: so what? You only fast for a couple of days and probably no more than two weeks.

I really hope these mild negative throat-related symptoms won´t steer anyone away from fasting...the most powerful tool we have in medicine for health and longevity.

My anecdotal experience from 9 water fasts and several FMDs is that it really opened up my sinuses and also cleared any inflamed gums in the mouth. The anti-inflammatory effect of not eating is remarkable.
p75213
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Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:04 am

Re: Effect of Fasting on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease in Male Subjects

Post by p75213 » Wed Feb 12, 2020 5:45 pm

As somebody who suffers with gerd, my anecdotal experience with fasting is it made it worse. In particular an increase in having to swallow due to a lump in my throat. Not too much of a problem during the day. However it interferes with sleep during the night.
Fred

Re: Effect of Fasting on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease in Male Subjects

Post by Fred » Wed Feb 12, 2020 5:53 pm

Sleep is often disturbed by fasting anyway. Fasting is like exercise, you have to suffer some to get the benefits.
smokinjoe
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Re: Effect of Fasting on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease in Male Subjects

Post by smokinjoe » Mon Feb 24, 2020 6:48 pm

p75213 wrote:
Wed Feb 12, 2020 5:45 pm
As somebody who suffers with gerd, my anecdotal experience with fasting is it made it worse. In particular an increase in having to swallow due to a lump in my throat. Not too much of a problem during the day. However it interferes with sleep during the night.
I wonder why that is.. did you find you have more stomach gas when fasting?
Male, 41
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RobSmith
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Re: Effect of Fasting on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease in Male Subjects

Post by RobSmith » Sat Mar 07, 2020 1:25 pm

I've suffered from acid reflux for 5 - 6 years now and have been taking Omeprazole for most of that time. Admittedly my fasting isn't for a particularly long period (I only miss breakfast so it's 18 hours) and I do carry on drinking water or green tea or black coffee throughout the morning. Anyway, I haven't noticed anything negative at all in terms of symptoms, and if anything, it feels like I have less stomach gas now.
I found that the green tea can act as a bit of an appetite suppressant and as a result it feels like it suppresses the release of stomach acid.
Having been on the NMN for getting on for a month I've now started to miss out an Omeprazole dose for a couple of days a week (again with no negative effects so far) and I might slowly see how far I can reduce it over the course of the rest of this year and am happy to report on this again in the future.
Conclusion is, try drinking green tea to see if this helps - it certainly won't do you any harm.
p75213
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Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:04 am

Re: Effect of Fasting on Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease in Male Subjects

Post by p75213 » Sat Mar 07, 2020 4:13 pm

My stomach has issues with both green and black tea. Also coffee.
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