LongevityDr Sinclairs four longevity strategies: 2. Time-restricted feeding

Fred
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Joined: Tue Aug 13, 2019 3:17 pm
Location: Sweden

Dr Sinclairs four longevity strategies: 2. Time-restricted feeding

Post by Fred » Sat Jan 11, 2020 12:03 pm

2. Eat Less Often

There is nothing revolutionary about fasting. As far back as Hippocrates, the ancient Greek physician, doctors have been espousing the benefits of limiting what we eat. This is not the same thing as malnutrition, in which the systems of our bodies begin to prey upon one another. But allowing our bodies to exist in a state of want — more often than most of us allow in our privileged world of plenty — is unquestionably good for our health and longevity.

There are numerous studies pointing to the health benefits of intermittent fasting. In one such study that Matthew and I discussed in Lifespan, participants ate a normal diet most of the time, but five days a month ate a restricted diet. In three months, those who maintained the “fasting mimicking” diet lost weight, reduced their body fat and lowered their blood pressure, too. Participants also had lower levels of a hormone primarily made in the liver called insulin-like growth factor 1, or IGF-1. Mutations in the IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor gene are associated with lower rates of death and disease.

So what do I do? My blood sugar rises in the morning and I am not hungry, so I skip breakfast, except for two tablespoons of a homemade yogurt. I try to skip lunch or eat a late lunch of a small soup or salad. At dinner I eat a “normal” dinner, with a focus on plant-based foods and not overeating. My downfall is alcohol. I often have a glass of wine for dinner a few times a week.

Given the number of studies and complexity of intermittent fasting, I will cover this topic in an upcoming newsletter. The bottom line is that there is no “best diet.” What works for someone may not work for another. We are all different, with different ages, circadian rhythms, jobs, body compositions, microbiomes, stresses, and wants. No matter what you do, a little fasting goes a long way. In the meantime, you can download the recent article my colleagues Mark Mattson and Rafa de Cabo published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

https://lifespanbook.com/4-intervention ... 8-72616753


Fred
Registered dietitian, Sweden.
NewLifeScience
Posts: 147
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2019 4:17 pm

Re: Dr Sinclairs four longevity strategies: 2. Time-restricted feeding

Post by NewLifeScience » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:15 pm

Fred wrote:
Sat Jan 11, 2020 12:03 pm
So what do I do? My blood sugar rises in the morning and I am not hungry, so I skip breakfast, except for two tablespoons of a homemade yogurt. I try to skip lunch or eat a late lunch of a small soup or salad. At dinner I eat a “normal” dinner, with a focus on plant-based foods and not overeating. My downfall is alcohol. I often have a glass of wine for dinner a few times a week.
That doesn't sound like very much alcohol.

But i have been noticing the very occasional study suggesting to avoid it altogether. Maybe it has to do with one's relationship with sugar.
Taking:
Resveratrol 400mg since June 2019; 600mg since October 1
NMN Sublingual 250mg since june 2019 500mg since September 2019; 600mg since Dec 1, 2019
NAD+ Nasal, appx 100mg per day since September 2019; 200mg per day beginning mid November
Fred
Posts: 376
Joined: Tue Aug 13, 2019 3:17 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: Dr Sinclairs four longevity strategies: 2. Time-restricted feeding

Post by Fred » Mon Jan 13, 2020 11:03 pm

NewLifeScience wrote:
Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:15 pm
Fred wrote:
Sat Jan 11, 2020 12:03 pm
So what do I do? My blood sugar rises in the morning and I am not hungry, so I skip breakfast, except for two tablespoons of a homemade yogurt. I try to skip lunch or eat a late lunch of a small soup or salad. At dinner I eat a “normal” dinner, with a focus on plant-based foods and not overeating. My downfall is alcohol. I often have a glass of wine for dinner a few times a week.
That doesn't sound like very much alcohol.

But i have been noticing the very occasional study suggesting to avoid it altogether. Maybe it has to do with one's relationship with sugar.
The text is from Dr Sinclairs blog, not my words ^^
Fred
Registered dietitian, Sweden.
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